March 2016 Update and Copyright

Updates to site
The African Archive Guide now includes Namibia, thanks to James Stejskal
The Membership list has been updated to reflect new members.

Discussion Forum postings – Martin Plaut responded to the posting on Boers serving.

Conference Update
There has been a fantastic international response to the Great War in Africa Conference to be held in May. Thanks to all who submitted papers. All African theatres are covered, with biographies, film, novels and social aspects being covered. There will also be displays of other aspects of the war – so if you want to submit a poster or display article, please get in touch. Books will also be on sale – including at least 2 new titles. Please get in touch if you want to promote your book at the conference.
Finally, don’t forget to book your place.

Copyright
Legislation was passed in September 2015 which affects copyright and intellectual property rights of authors and photographers. I thought it worthwhile sharing the main points.

If you are the owner of original manuscripts, diaries, images and photos of people involved in WW1, it does not mean you own the copyright. The copyright rests with the person who created the item. If you want to reproduce the item, permission from the person who created the item, or their heir, needs to be obtained. This can involve some searching. Where the copyright holder cannot be found, the item is referred to as an orphan work. There is a checklist to confirm orphan status, and further detail can be found here.

On the positive side, fair usage of copyright material has been extended for education purposes. Details can be found here.

Specific copyright periods likely to affect World War 1 materials.

For computer generated work, copyright lasts for 50 years from the end of the calendar year in which the work was created.
Crown copyright (British Government produced documents, published and unpublished) – best to check The National Archive guidance
Parliamentary copyright – 50 years from the end of the calendar year in which the work was made

Now for the crunch on works of unknown authorship: for unpublished works which were created before 1989, copyright remains in place until 31 December 2039.
When a work is published, or the author/creator is identified, copyright reverts to the life plus 70 years from the end of the year in which the person died.

Works created for an employer belong to the employer and their permission needs to be obtained for publication purposes; for military and admiralty reports the employer is the Crown.

The above applies to British legislation and documents produced in Britain. Documents produced in other countries and by citizens of other countries are governed by the laws pertaining to those countries, so should be checked. The UK law is now in alignment with EU directives as set out in this guidance.

Author: Anne

Publications: Britain, South Africa and the East Africa Campaign 1914-1918: the Union comes of age (IB Tauris, 2005) World War I in Africa: The Forgotten Conflict Among the European Powers (International Library of Twentieth Century History; IB Tauris, 2013) I am a London-based South African historian working on British and South African relations over Africa from 1910 onwards. My main focus to date has been the First World War although I am also working on later periods. In technical terms, I would be classified as a geo-political and war historian as opposed to a military expert. My overarching interest is British and South African relations over Africa from Union until 1994 and have done some work on South Africa’s ‘non-war’ in Angola in the 1970s-1990s as well as starting on WW2. The main focus of my work is trying to understand what it was all for (interlinking of politics and reality as well as remembrance). All my history work is done as an Independent Scholar at present not affiliated to any university (although I work for 2 – in other faculties). I’ve done this purposefully to keep my independence in terms of interest and focus. My husband, John, and I have travelled quite a bit of Tanzania as I also volunteer as an education adviser for an education charity in the Kilimanjaro area of Tanzania. Amongst other things, we’ve “done” Liemba and visited Tanga, Mikindani, Abercorn, Chembeshi and southern Malawi. John’s interest in East Africa is seeing the countryside and wildlife and taking photos – thank goodness all those battlefields are in reserves! – so we can combine our interests.

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