February 2017 update

The Battlefield Tour has been cancelled. Although this is disappointing, it has been a worthwhile experience in working out how people visit the battlesites of Africa. Watch this space for futher developments allowing you to do your own tours.

A WW1 Africa connection who is not a member brought this to my attention – it shows Smuts also got annoyed with the South African generals – van Deventer. Details do need to be checked as Tighe returned to India in March 1916 – the image suggests he was still around in December 1916.

A book on the Mendi, Troopship Mendi: The Black Titanic by Nick Ward is available.
The African Chapter of The Times History of the War
Michelle Moyd has an article in the July 2016 First World War Studies journal (vol 7:2): Centring a sideshow: local experiences of the First World War in Africa

A special edition of Scientia Militaria has been published on The Union at War 1914-1953. Papers can be found on the website.

And The National Archives in London gives an overview of its Africa World War 1 holdings.

Don’t forget there’s a complete list of known books, articles, films, etc on the website.

@WW1EACampaignposts regularly on aspects of the EA campaign.

Some video histories of World War 1 Africa courtesty of Frontier Partisans

Requests for information:
Cecil Gorge Bateman

Projects
The GWAA was part of a bid with Away From the Western Front: the medical project previously mentioned
Here’s confirmation of the bid’s success. Anyone interested in participating, please get in touch.

Author: Anne

Publications: Britain, South Africa and the East Africa Campaign 1914-1918: the Union comes of age (IB Tauris, 2005) World War I in Africa: The Forgotten Conflict Among the European Powers (International Library of Twentieth Century History; IB Tauris, 2013) I am a London-based South African historian working on British and South African relations over Africa from 1910 onwards. My main focus to date has been the First World War although I am also working on later periods. In technical terms, I would be classified as a geo-political and war historian as opposed to a military expert. My overarching interest is British and South African relations over Africa from Union until 1994 and have done some work on South Africa’s ‘non-war’ in Angola in the 1970s-1990s as well as starting on WW2. The main focus of my work is trying to understand what it was all for (interlinking of politics and reality as well as remembrance). All my history work is done as an Independent Scholar at present not affiliated to any university (although I work for 2 – in other faculties). I’ve done this purposefully to keep my independence in terms of interest and focus. My husband, John, and I have travelled quite a bit of Tanzania as I also volunteer as an education adviser for an education charity in the Kilimanjaro area of Tanzania. Amongst other things, we’ve “done” Liemba and visited Tanga, Mikindani, Abercorn, Chembeshi and southern Malawi. John’s interest in East Africa is seeing the countryside and wildlife and taking photos – thank goodness all those battlefields are in reserves! – so we can combine our interests.

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